Grainline Linden Sweatshirt Version 2

Grainline Linden

Grainline Linden Sweatshirt

It’s already getting too hot to wear long sleeves in Austin but I loved this chunky, coral, rib knit fabric from Joann so much that I decided to try sewing a “summer sweater.” That’s not a real term but I’m claiming it now.

Grainline Linden Sweatshirt

This is my second version of Grainline Linden Sweatshirt pattern.

This time I went with View B – slightly cropped without the hem band, shorter sleeves and no cuffs. The boxy shape of this design makes it less restricting in the heat and the shorter length works well for mid-rise shorts.

Grainline Linden Sweatshirt

I didn’t look closely at the bolt when I bought this fabric but it clearly has some poly in it. My favorite part is the color, though, gotta love that coral pink!

Grainline Linden Sweatshirt

I’ve actually taught the Linden several times as a class at The Cloth Pocket so I know the pattern well, even though I’ve only sewn it twice. The entire thing is stitched with a serger and a zig-zag for the hems.

Grainline Linden Sweatshirt

This shirt is already in heavy rotation in my wardrobe. I think we have a winner!

Grainline Linden Sweatshirt

Two Grainline Willow Tanks

Grainline Willow Tank
A double feature for today! Two versions of the Grainline Willow Tank. Perfect for scraps or short yardages!

I love all the Grainline patterns I’ve tried. I’m surprised it took me this long to make this pattern.Grainline Willow Tank

I had enough leftover cotton from my Grainline Farrow dress to whip out my first Willow.

Grainline Willow Tank

It’s a super simple pattern. Only two pieces plus bias for facings. I like the extra deep hem which helps give the bottom of the shirt some structure.

Grainline Willow Tank

For this first shirt, I tried a size 6 but decided the fit was just a wee bit too big. The dart points are also a little low.

Grainline Willow Tank and Blueprints for Sewing A-Frame Skirt

So for my second version, I made a size 4. Better. The dart points are still slightly too low but they’re not terrible. When I make this a third time I’ll probably just rotate the points slightly higher.

Grainline Willow Tank

This version used a Japanese cotton also from The Cloth Pocket.

Grainline Willow Tank

AND (!!!) I used leftover suede from my A-Frame skirt to make bias binding for the neck and armholes! It’s an effect that’s better felt in person than in pictures but I love the added texture and sheen of the suede against the palm print.

Grainline Willow Tank

I’m teaching a class at The Cloth Pocket for this pattern if you want to learn to make it yourself (or just want to spend some social sewing time with me and a few new friends)!

Cropped Closet Case Kalle Shirt

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

These pics were taken a couple days before we were inundated with rain from Hurricane Harvey. We’re alright here in Austin. It’s just been a nonstop downpour. I’m hunkered down indoors in the meantime with nothing much to do except sew or read or watch the news. And the news just keeps getting worse.

If you’re looking to help out the victims of the storm, please donate to a disaster relief agency or a local charity.

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

Back to sewing related topics: This is my second version of the Closet Case Patterns Kalle Shirt.

My first make was a shortened version of B with the popover style and regular collar. This time I made version A – cropped with a Mandarin collar, hidden button placket, and deep pleat in back.

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

I actually got this fabric from a store in Houston when I went this spring for a birthday trip. It’s a finely woven, cotton chambray (black and white) shirting. Unlike my first Kalle, this fabric is crisp and holds its shape well which accentuates the boxy shape (but also shows more wrinkles).

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt
(hidden button placket)

The hidden buttons are some plain black plastic from my stash. The one visible button is a leftover patina-ed metal piece.

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

Usually, I wear this shirt with the collar unbuttoned. Next time I sew this pattern I’ll need to make adjustments to the neckline like lowering it in the front. This is probably a side effect of needing some kind of shoulder adjustment which is common.

As it is, if I button the collar it’s just a little too tight. I never noticed this in my last Kalle because I never button the collar on that version.

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

I didn’t make any fitting changes and because it was my second time making this pattern I finished it pretty quick. The hidden placket can seem a little daunting with all the folding but just follow the instructions and it’ll go smoothly.

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

The shirt is definitely cropped so if you don’t love that look I suggest sewing one of the other views in the pattern. As for me, my wardrobe pairings are a little limited. I have a few high-waist skirts I can wear with it, or these higher-waist jeans. This shirt may not be as versatile as my first version but since I like the fashion-forward style so much, I’ve made the effort to keep it in heavy rotation.

Closet Case Kalle Cropped Shirt

Could this be a new TNT pattern for me? I should try to sew the dress version next…

Closet Case Kalle Shirt

This is the first garment in several months that I’ve finished just for myself – not for a class, not sewing for anyone else. I liked the design of the Closet Case Kalle Shirt as soon as I saw it and printed it out immediately.

I sewed the popover style view B with the full collar and one pocket. I did shorten the length of both the front and back by about three inches. So it’s longer than view A but shorter than the original view B. I thought that might be more versatile for my wardrobe.The instructions were great – clear with well-labeled pieces. I liked the little tip for forming curved pocket corners and I appreciate a slightly smaller undercollar piece. Details like that make for a good pattern.

The placket goes together well if you pay special attention to all of those indicated fold lines, which I didn’t, ’cause I was lazy. Take my advice, follow the placket instructions carefully and you’ll be successful.

This fun polka-dot fabric is an especially smooth and finely woven Japanese cotton from The Cloth Pocket. I love it! It’s so soft and surprisingly doesn’t wrinkle much for a cotton. It’s so well printed that it’s difficult to tell the front side from the back. It’s thin but opaque, the perfect shirt fabric. I couldn’t find it on their website but if you come across it, definitely pick some up.

Buttons are just some simple plastic ones from Joann. I went with black so as not to compete with the fabric.

This shirt feels like a nice store bought shirt: great fabric, everything inside is finished with a serger, cute and stylish design.

This shirt might be just the thing I needed to get out of my sewing-funk. It’s a simple design with a lot of style which makes it easy to sew but also rewarding to finish.

Next, I’m starting a new historical costume which should be quite a bit of work but I hope finishing this shirt will inspire me to get sewing again!