Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

This jacket is not my best work. Just putting that out there at the start. But sometimes you just need to see a project through to the end and I’m glad I finished it. And while I liked the design (thumb cuffs, hood, curvy fit), the combination of fabric, fit, and details just wasn’t working for me.

This is my Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket. I originally bought the pattern because I loved the pleated back version but I realized you need a really good knit to hold those pleats at the hem so for my first try I went with the plain back.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

It’s been so long since I started this project that I’ve forgotten where I sourced my fabric. The main fabric is a green ponte I bought online. It’s pretty thin for a ponte, more like a thick jersey. The hood lining and pockets are  leftover black mesh fabric from these leggings.Greenstyle Creations Sundance JacketI struggled to find zippers and drawstrings for the hood that matched this olive green. Eventually, I went a different direction and bought these hot pink shoelaces. I decided to roll with the pink and topstitched my seams with matching thread.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

Looking back, I don’t think I should have done the topstitching. Trying to sew a straight stitch on a knit made my stitches uneven and the hem wavy. From a distance, the stitching’s not bad but I don’t like the look of it up close.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

The pattern offers two different options for sewing the thumb holes in the cuffs. I went with topstitching, but at this point, I was already so disappointed with the hot pink thread, I stuck with green for this part.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

I could use a sway back adjustment. That’s pretty common for me, though.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

You can see how the hem is a little floppy around the hips.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

The jacket includes zipped side seam pockets. The pocket pieces are curved. The bottom edge gets caught in the hem stitching but as you can see, it’s just a floppy pocket inside. This was a missed opportunity to just extend the pocket and have it attach to that princess seam in the front. No more floppy pocket. If I were to make this pattern again, this would be my first change.  (You can also tell when I started losing interest in this project because that middle seam isn’t finished. Oh, well.)

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

The cuffs are extra long to cover most of your hand, but even then, I think the sleeves are a bit too long for me.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

One other thing that bothers me: the drawstring casing that is sewn in the hood is pretty wide. It’s like an inch while the width of the shoelace is less than half an inch. That means the casing bunches up oddly when you pull the drawstring tight. It looks like little ripples around my head. I’ve smoothed the casing out for these photos.

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

So with all of that summed up, here are some changes I would make next time:

  • Adjust the pockets
  • No topstitching
  • Swayback adjustment
  • Thicker fabric
  • Deeper hem
  • Thinner drawstring casing in the hood
  • Slightly shorter sleeves

I don’t hate this jacket but it’s not something I’m especially proud of. Despite that, I’ve gotten so much use out of it this winter while running!

Greenstyle Creations Sundance Jacket

And lastly, I got this sweet t-shirt for Christmas. Perfect for running and sewing!

Closet Case Patterns Ebony Dress

Closet Case Ebony Dress

My serger is currently on the fritz so I haven’t been sewing as much, and what I have been sewing are gifts. And since I can’t really share those, I guess I’ll catch up on a few unblogged projects…

This is the Ebony knit Dress by Closet Case Patterns. I made View A with the scoop neck of View B.

Closet Case Ebony Dress

I sewed this dress as a sample for my new class at The Cloth Pocket in December.

My fabric is a cotton sweatshirt terrycloth (also from the cloth pocket) that’s heather black on the right side and white on the wrong side. I rolled up the sleeves in these pics to show off the underside.

Closet Case Ebony Dress

The fabric was stretchy enough for this pattern but the terry backside made the seams a little bulky and hard to serge. Because of that I made the neckband a little thicker to make it easier to work with.

Closet Case Ebony Dress

Overall I liked the pattern and instructions. This swingy dress is simple and quick to sew. I can definitely see myself whipping up a few of these dresses with long sleeves for winter.

My paper pattern included a supplementary sheet with an updated sleeve piece. The original piece had a grading error in the smaller sizes but when I measured the new updated sleeve piece in my size I knew it would be too tight for my arms.

Closet Case Ebony Dress

I adjusted the sleeve so that I didn’t change the length of the sleeve cap much but made the cap and bicep wider by almost an inch. Which was good, because I definitely needed it with this fabric. If my fabric were stretchier I could probably get away without it but I didn’t want to take the chance with this thicker sweatshirt knit.

Closet Case Ebony Dress

This dress is VERY voluminous at the hem which is why you have to use wide fabric.

Closet Case Ebony Dress

I know I’ll make this pattern again, likely from a different type of fabric — and depending on what fabric I use I’ll probably use some kind of stabilizer on that curved hem.

Sequin Grainline Lark Tee

In case you haven’t noticed, I haven’t been sewing much lately. I’ve had a few sewing setbacks with a couple patterns I’ve tried and I just haven’t been feeling that inspired. But I have made a few things, like this sparkly Lark Tee I sewed as a sample for a class I taught at the Cloth Pocket.

I got the fabric from a swap. It’s a burnout jersey of mysterious fiber content with tiny sequins stitched throughout with clear thread. And before you ask, yes, it is itchy. But only on the hems and collar and not enough to keep me from wearing the shirt. 😉

I didn’t make any changes to the pattern except for grading up a size at the hips. Grainline patterns tend to fit me pretty well although I could probably use a swayback adjustment.

Overall I really like the fit. It’s slightly curved in the waist and the shortest sleeves hit me at a good length. I think this will be my new go-to t-shirt pattern!

So what do you do when you’re not feeling inspired to sew? Do you do something else entirely? Or try to sew something quick and easy? How do you get your sewjo back??

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings, McCall’s 7446 Leggings, Simplicity 1463 Top

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

Another day, another activewear sewing project. What can I say? I’m obsessed. This time it’s a triple threat!

First up: the Sewaholic Pacific Leggings.

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I made view C, the cropped leggings, with one big alteration: I slashed the back legs and added mesh panels behind the knees which echo the style lines in view B.

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

One small alteration: I nixed the crotch gusset (the feature that made me excited to try this pattern) because, well, it was giving me some major foot-of-a-desert-pack-animal going on in front. Disappointing, but an easy fix as the legs can be sewn without the gusset with no need to alter the pattern pieces.

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

I liked the method of sewing the elastic into the waist yoke – makes for a clean finish with no visible stitching. And the curved seam lines are cool. They’re more visible in person. Next time I’ll try some contrast top stitching to highlight them.

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

I didn’t make the back zippered pocket because I didn’t have a zip on hand and wanted to sew up these leggings immediately.

Both the main heather gray/black fabric and the mesh came from Joann. Who knew they carry a whole activewear collection now? The black yoke fabric was scrap from Rockywoods.com.

Overall, this is a great pattern and I can’t wait to make more versions. Oh, and this…

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Hey Austinites! I’m teaching a class on the Pacific Leggings at The Cloth Pocket on December 13th and 15th. Sign up here!

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Simplicity 1463 and McCall's 7446

Using the same heathered fabric and mesh I made an altered version of View A of Simplicity 1463.

simplicity-tops-vests-pattern-1463-envelope-front

I altered the pattern to add the mesh shoulder panels by slicing off the top of the front and back pieces by 1.5″+seam allowance. Then I cut 3″+seam allowance-wide mesh strips to insert between the front and back pieces at the shoulder seam.

Simplicity 1463

I topstitched the seam allowance along the mesh panel to keep everything nice and flat. The mesh adds a fun sporty touch.

Simplicity 1463 and McCall's 7446

Ok, so here’s my problem with this pattern: the sleeve cuffs end right at the elbow. Not above or below so I feel like I constantly have to adjust the sleeves but pushing them up or down. If I pull them down below the elbow, it pulls at the neckline. If I push them up, the fabric above the cuff bunches up, but this is my preferred way to wear the top.

Simplicity 1463

If I were to use this pattern again, I’d shorten the cuff and the length of the sleeve portion of the top so that they ends above the elbow instead of some kind of bendy no-man’s land.

I can wear this top to a dance class or for Krav Maga and maybe as a popover for running on cooler mornings.

Simplicity 1463 and McCall's 7446

Lastly, using more fabric found at Joann, I made a pair of McCall’s 7446 leggings. This fabric features a metallic gold swirl pattern on black that I loved but it doesn’t show the seam lines of this pattern well.

mccalls7446

The curved seam reminded me a lot of Papercut Pattern’s Ohh La Leggings which I have made before. There are some things about this pattern that I like more than Papercut and vice versa.

McCall's 7446

I liked the McCall’s pattern’s side pocket along the leg. I haven’t make a pair of leggings with that style pocket before but it works great for holding keys or your phone.

The curve along the bum reaches higher in the McCall’s than the OLL, which I prefer. I can feel the curve on the OLLs when I sit down and I prefer the look of the higher curve.

McCall's 7446

The OLLs use a folded over elastic waist while the McCall’s uses and un-supported waistband. The band is a little too thick so it likes to bend over on itself and doesn’t want to stay flat. I prefer the OLL waist method.

If you don’t count the waistband, both patterns have the same number of pieces but the OLLs don’t have side seams on the legs (which is silly, those McCall’s side seams don’t give any shape to the legs. The front and back side pieces should have just been combined into one piece, unless you’re going for extreme color blocking). I think the OLL are easier to cut out and quicker to sew.

In the end, I like my sparkly gold leggings even if the construction could have been simplified. If I want another pair in this style I think I’ll alter the OLLs and add a pocket if needed.