Sewaholic Pacific Leggings, McCall’s 7446 Leggings, Simplicity 1463 Top

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

Another day, another activewear sewing project. What can I say? I’m obsessed. This time it’s a triple threat!

First up: the Sewaholic Pacific Leggings.

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I made view C, the cropped leggings, with one big alteration: I slashed the back legs and added mesh panels behind the knees which echo the style lines in view B.

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

One small alteration: I nixed the crotch gusset (the feature that made me excited to try this pattern) because, well, it was giving me some major foot-of-a-desert-pack-animal going on in front. Disappointing, but an easy fix as the legs can be sewn without the gusset with no need to alter the pattern pieces.

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

I liked the method of sewing the elastic into the waist yoke – makes for a clean finish with no visible stitching. And the curved seam lines are cool. They’re more visible in person. Next time I’ll try some contrast top stitching to highlight them.

Sewaholic Pacific Leggings

I didn’t make the back zippered pocket because I didn’t have a zip on hand and wanted to sew up these leggings immediately.

Both the main heather gray/black fabric and the mesh came from Joann. Who knew they carry a whole activewear collection now? The black yoke fabric was scrap from Rockywoods.com.

Overall, this is a great pattern and I can’t wait to make more versions. Oh, and this…

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Hey Austinites! I’m teaching a class on the Pacific Leggings at The Cloth Pocket on December 13th and 15th. Sign up here!

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Simplicity 1463 and McCall's 7446

Using the same heathered fabric and mesh I made an altered version of View A of Simplicity 1463.

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I altered the pattern to add the mesh shoulder panels by slicing off the top of the front and back pieces by 1.5″+seam allowance. Then I cut 3″+seam allowance-wide mesh strips to insert between the front and back pieces at the shoulder seam.

Simplicity 1463

I topstitched the seam allowance along the mesh panel to keep everything nice and flat. The mesh adds a fun sporty touch.

Simplicity 1463 and McCall's 7446

Ok, so here’s my problem with this pattern: the sleeve cuffs end right at the elbow. Not above or below so I feel like I constantly have to adjust the sleeves but pushing them up or down. If I pull them down below the elbow, it pulls at the neckline. If I push them up, the fabric above the cuff bunches up, but this is my preferred way to wear the top.

Simplicity 1463

If I were to use this pattern again, I’d shorten the cuff and the length of the sleeve portion of the top so that they ends above the elbow instead of some kind of bendy no-man’s land.

I can wear this top to a dance class or for Krav Maga and maybe as a popover for running on cooler mornings.

Simplicity 1463 and McCall's 7446

Lastly, using more fabric found at Joann, I made a pair of McCall’s 7446 leggings. This fabric features a metallic gold swirl pattern on black that I loved but it doesn’t show the seam lines of this pattern well.

mccalls7446

The curved seam reminded me a lot of Papercut Pattern’s Ohh La Leggings which I have made before. There are some things about this pattern that I like more than Papercut and vice versa.

McCall's 7446

I liked the McCall’s pattern’s side pocket along the leg. I haven’t make a pair of leggings with that style pocket before but it works great for holding keys or your phone.

The curve along the bum reaches higher in the McCall’s than the OLL, which I prefer. I can feel the curve on the OLLs when I sit down and I prefer the look of the higher curve.

McCall's 7446

The OLLs use a folded over elastic waist while the McCall’s uses and un-supported waistband. The band is a little too thick so it likes to bend over on itself and doesn’t want to stay flat. I prefer the OLL waist method.

If you don’t count the waistband, both patterns have the same number of pieces but the OLLs don’t have side seams on the legs (which is silly, those McCall’s side seams don’t give any shape to the legs. The front and back side pieces should have just been combined into one piece, unless you’re going for extreme color blocking). I think the OLL are easier to cut out and quicker to sew.

In the end, I like my sparkly gold leggings even if the construction could have been simplified. If I want another pair in this style I think I’ll alter the OLLs and add a pocket if needed.

Hudson Pants and Two Pneuma Sports Bras

Denim French Terry Hudson Pants

Activewear sewing continues!

Denim French Terry Hudson Pants

These are my third True Bias Hudson Pants and my first capri version.

Denim French Terry Hudson Pants

They’re made from a super soft and lightweight “denim” French terry from LA Finch Fabrics that I also used for this Plantain shirt.

Denim French Terry Hudson Pants

I cut a size 4 so they’re pretty slim fitting and I also adjusted the front crotch curve to get rid of some excess fabric in the center. Other than that, the only change I made was omitting the drawstring.

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These two sports bras are made with Papercut Patterns’ Pneuma Tank pattern.

Both were sewn months ago and are in heavy rotation. They’re definitely my favorite sports bras that I own.

Papercut Patterns' Pneuma Sports Bra

The fabric is fantastic – two colors of a lovely supplex nylon knit from Rockywoods.com. I used the fuschia for these leggings.

Papercut Patterns' Pneuma Sports Bra

I doubled the fabric on the front half of the bra to add extra support. Instead of using bra-strapping I made narrow tubes of self fabric for the criss -cross straps.

I have enough of the green fabric left to maybe make another sports bra. I might try a cropped version of Fehr Trade’s XYT Workout Top.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings (doing my best zombie “Thriller” pose)

I’ve been working out lately. Like, a lot. Running every morning (highly recommend the Cto5K app for your phone…), yoga-ing (that’s totally a word, right?), taking Krav Maga classes, and this month Miss Lulu and I are taking a workshop to learn the dance to “Thriller” for Halloween!

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

So to facilitate all this running and punching and zombie dancing, I’ve been sewing ALL THE ACTIVEWEAR.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

These projects are both the Steeplechase leggings from Fehr Trade. It’s a well-drafted pattern with fun seam lines, perfect for a crazy print.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

My first pair used a black knit for the yoke and a galaxy print for the legs; both came from Rockywoods.com. The print is fun but if I had more of the fabric I would have spread the print around more so the big splotched of galaxy wouldn’t be so close together. I had only bought a yard, however.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

For these leggings, I bought a floral scuba knit from LA Finch Fabrics. I think Finch buys lots of jobbers: ends of bolts and surplus fabric from designers. This print was a little strange, it looked like it was printed specifically for pattern pieces to be cut out from it. For example, the flowers would end abruptly in the middle of the fabric and there was an unprinted horizontal line that seemed to break along yard markings like the fabric was printed in panels.

I was able to cut around the weird printing but it’s something to note if you want to buy the same fabric.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

On this second pair the curved seams around the hips are a little wavy.

This could be caused by two reasons. 1) After sewing my first pair on my serger I discovered that my serger had major tension issues. The far left thread would snap if you pulled on the seam too forcefully. Obviously, no bueno. So I was forced to re-sew entirely over the existing stitched seams with a zig zag stitch. On this pair I skipped the serger and did zig zag only. This possibly caused the fabric to stretch as I sewed or 2) My assembly method might have been different trying to sew the points at the front hip. Perhaps if I had flipped the fabric and sewn with the opposite layer on top I could have more easily pivoted around the points?

Either way, it isn’t a big deal but next time I’ll pay better attention/get my serger fixed.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

I like the pocket at the back waist, good to hold keys while running or a mouth guard in Krav class.

The legs are a little long on me but that may be the fabric, it’s quite stretchy. I could always cut the capri length instead.

Fehr Trade Steeplechase Leggings

The fact that the leggings have no inseam is a big plus, definitely my favorite feature, but it also makes the pattern pieces extra wide, too wide to lay side by side. Something to think about if you’re buying a wonky stripe or directional print.

I’ve made two of these leggings now and I wouldn’t be against making them again, but at this point I’d like to try out a new pattern. Maybe the Jalie Cora’s?

Patterns for Pirates – Peg Leg Leggings

Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs

EVEN. MORE. ACTIVEWEAR. SEWING.

Yep, I’m on a roll and perhaps even a little obsessed. Most of my sewing the past couple months has been geared toward some type of sports, exercise or outdoorsy-ness. Sorry, not sorry.

Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs

This is my first Patterns for Pirates make and it’s pretty successful. These are the Peg Legs – a simple leggings pattern with no side seams (yay!) and no waistband elastic (double yay!).

The fabric is again from Rockywoods.com (gotta maximize that shipping!). It’s a fancy UnderArmor HeatGear poly/elastane knit with SPF 50+ and wicking ability and all that cool stuff.

Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs

I made a size medium, capri length but this fabric is so stretchy the legs could easily stretch to my ankles.

 

My only struggle with this pattern wasn’t with the design itself but the assembly. P4P uses “no trim” printing pages. You just line up the edges. At first I thought this was cool, no cutting! But my printer doesn’t print less than ~3/4″ from the edge in any direction. That means lots of edges got cut off including most of the page numbers.

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For example – is this a B or a D? I’m pretty sure it’s a 4?? Who knows!? In the top corners, printed numbers 1, 4 and 7 get so truncated that I can’t tell them apart. A page number printed in the center of the page (like a watermark) would have helped. There wasn’t even a full page layout image included in the instructions to which I could compare my printed sheets!! Ugh, that annoyed me.

Luckily there weren’t many sheets as this pattern is only one piece (you cut the legs shorter for the four length options and the waistband is just a rectangle you cut out separately) and the pattern tells you not to print a couple pages if you’re below a certain size.

Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs

If I were to make these again I would even out the rise between the front and the back. The back waist is a little high for me and the front waist is a little low.

Since these leggings have no pockets for keys they’ll probably be relegated to yoga/exercise rather than running.

Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs

These were a fun pair to whip together in an afternoon – few pieces and even fewer seams! But they’re a little plain. Next time I want to try the Sewaholic Pacific Leggings as they have more decorative seaming and a back zip pocket at the waistband, better for running.