Cut-out Dress Version 3.0

Bonnell Dress
I’ve been busy busy busy working on all kinds of sewing but it’s been so cold and rainy lately that I’ve not yet been able to take pics of anything until now.

This is my third iteration of this dress and I’m quite excited to share it with you!

Bonnell Dress

The Pattern: Self-drafted. I only made minor adjustments since my second version but nothing that is noticeable.

Bonnell Dress

The Fabric: A brilliant silk/cotton blend with a paneled border print from Austin Fabric Co-op. Alas the Co-op is now closed – the third fabric store closure in the last 6 months. I’m so sad.

I snagged the final two-ish yards of this fabric on the very last day the shop was open and I struggled to fit my pattern pieces just right to take advantage of the print. I barely squeezed out the front bodice with some scant seam allowances on one side.

Bonnell Dress

I love the geometric look which compliments the triangle cut-outs, I think. The border print makes it look like I’ve got a nifty yoke on the bodice.

It was difficult to match up the print when cutting because the fabric shifted so much. I had to spray starch most of it.

The lining is plain ol’ white muslin.

Bonnell Dress

The Changes: The only real difference – I lined the skirt. The fabric was too sheer on its own.

Bonnell Dress

The Results: This dress probably now resides in my top 5 garments I’ve ever made. The print, the colors, everything just screams ‘cool.’ And the cut-outs just add to the fun factor.

Which brings me to the good news – I’m making a pattern for this dress!

Bonnell Dress

First of all, I think I need to mention that skirt. I know I said I was planning on releasing a new pattern for a skirt months ago but I kept running into problem after problem with it, including major measurement issues. At this point I figured it might be easier to just start over from scratch. With that setback I felt like I needed an easier pattern project. One that didn’t frustrate me. One with fewer pieces. One that I could feasibly finish within a reasonable amount of time.

And huzzah! This dress pattern I’m almost finished! The PDF will have TEN (10!!)!!! sizes!! Also, full illustrations, detailed instructions, sewing tips, and more.

I’m nearly ready to send the pattern out to testers so if you’d like to test for me stay tuned in the next few days for more information!

Blank Slate Patterns Oceanside Shorts and Juniper Jersey

Blank Slate Oceanside Shorts

Hey readers! I’ve been slowly working on transferring my blog from Blogger to WordPress and I’ve been facing some struggles along the way, but I’m slowly getting there. Thanks to friends who’ve been sharing tips and tricks with me.

But today I want to show off some projects I’ve been doing for the Blank Slate Sewing Team. The team is a collective of bloggers making and sharing Blank Slate Patterns‘ designs. Blank Slate is made by Melissa of MellySews.com, a friend and fellow Austin-ite, who designs easy to sew womens and kids patterns.

So far I’ve sewn the Oceanside Shorts and the Juniper Jersey (click to see my original posts at Mellysews.com with more pics!).

Let’s start with…

The Pattern: My most recent make are my Oceanside Shorts. This pattern has the option to make pants or shorts. They were quick to sew – no side seams, no zipper, patch pockets. I serged all my seam allowances and tied knots at the ends of my drawstrings.

Blank Slate Oceanside Shorts

The Fabric: The pattern calls for drapey bottom weight material but I took a risk and used a striped cotton shirting which I got for free from a fabric swap. It works pretty well with this design although the thinner fabric does get pretty wrinkly. But the fabric looks like linen and these are a casual style or shorts so I think it works okay.

I used two metal shank buttons from my stash.

Blank Slate Oceanside Shorts

The Changes: My only real change was rolling up the legs about two inches to make cuffs. The pic above is the length of the shorts without rolling.

I didn’t have to do any fitting to these pants which surprised me. They’re pretty well fitted right out of the box. Obviously every body is different but I think the style is loose and casual enough to be forgiving.

The Results: I’m diggin’ these shorts, like, I highly recommend this pattern. I like that the drawstring isn’t just one long length of fabric. It’s two fabric tubes attached to a piece of elastic hidden in the middle. You only see the fabric drawstrings in the front but the elastic makes the waistband more snug in the back. I just wish I had used a better quality elastic. I can tell that it doesn’t have good recovery and it stretches out too much.

If only it was warmer so I could wear my shorts outside! These are going to be in heavy rotation this summer.

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Lace yoke on Juniper Jersey pattern by Blank Slate Patterns sewn by Dixie DIY

The Pattern: My first project was the Juniper Jersey. I liked that I could squeeze out the pieces with scraps and I could mix and match fabrics. I cut a size small which fit well.

The Fabric: My scrap yellow fabric is a double-knit? It might be a ponte… at this point I don’t remember.

The white lacy top fabric is some sort of franken-fiber stretchy stuff I bought on a fabric shopping trip to Dallas. I loved the lace effect but I was concerned it wouldn’t hold the weight of the yellow knit. Turns out the lace has a good recovery and it works just fine.

I serged all the seams which was good considering the negative space in the lace would have made it difficult to sew just on a regular machine.

The Changes: In the end I left the sleeve hems raw. At first I tried turning the raw edge under twice and hemming but it the lace created a lumpy mess so I just chopped it off rather than try to unpick my stitches. The fabric doesn’t fray which is convenient.

Back view - Juniper Jersey pattern by Blank Slate Patterns sewn by Dixie DIY

The Results: I’ve worn this shirt a bunch of times since making it. If you’ve never sewn a V-neck before then this is a good way to start. With the shoulder yoke it’s like a “cheater” v-neck, super easy to make.

Self Drafted Side Cut Out Dress 2.0

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I think we have a winner! I revised my bodice block and the bodice pieces I used for my first version of this dress and now the whole thing fits much better. My first version turned out disappointingly baggy.
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I lowered the V in the back and got rid of some annoying gaping here and there. It still has those side cut outs which I like more now that the bodice is more snug.
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I also added side seam pockets because every dress needs pockets but often I am too lazy to do it.
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This is a light-weight quilting cotton I bought locally at the Cloth Pocket. It’s mint with gold printed dots. Coolest of all – it’s a border print! I love border prints!
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I lined the bodice in some scrap white fabric and used a center back invisible zip.
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I shortened the skirt by about an inch and a half compared to version 1. I think I like the slightly above the knee look more.
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I’m pretty smitten with this dress!
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Also, in other important news. I’ve decided to transition my blog from Blogger over to WordPress and the process might get messy. So if you see images not loading or getting weird redirects for the next day or so this is why.

I hope that once everything is fully up and running again I’ll be able to do a lot more with this blog logistically but in the mean time dixiediy.blogspot.com will still be functional but dixiediy.com may not.

So to make up for any inconveniences here are some fun gifs that describe my emotional state as I deal with this daunting task…

 

 

 

See you all at WordPress later (I hope)!