Lily Sage & Co Splash Swimsuit + some pillows!

Lily Sage & Co Splash Swimsuit

It’s summer! That means it’s time for swimsuit sewing! This is the Splash Swimsuit by Lily Sage & Co.

This pattern came out a couple years ago but I only found it last fall. Back then I had just enough leftover galaxy fabric from these leggings to squeeze out a swimsuit. I cut the pieces out months ago but it wasn’t until the day before I was set to go visit family – and knowing we were going to go to the pool – that I sewed the suit.

Nothing like a deadline to give you motivation.

I added bust cups from Sew Sassy to the lining which gives the top some structure. To insert them you basically smoosh them down on top of the lining and stitch around the outer edge with zig-zag stitch to hold them in place. If you are a busty gal I highly recommend cutting a larger top size.

Lily Sage & Co Splash Swimsuit

The only fit change I made was a pretty significant sway back adjustment. I sliced off about 1.75″ from the center back of the pants grading to nothing at the side seams. Only I did that after I had already sewn on the waistband. With a serger. So I had to take all that stitching out first.

My advice, if you think you’ll need a sway back adjustment, be sure to try on the pants before adding the waistband…

The pants are high waisted but only go up to my belly button, which is lower than my natural waist, something to keep in mind depending on how high of a rise you like in your swimsuits.

Lily Sage & Co Splash Swimsuit
If I were to make this again I’d probably add just a half inch in length of the front piece and maybe go up one size in the width of the top.

This is the first pattern I’ve sewn by this company and I liked it. The instructions were a mix of illustrations and pictures but they were thorough and easy enough to follow. I appreciated the highlighted tips throughout. This is certainly easier than some other indie patterns if you’re a novice at swimsuit sewing.

And lastly, one of my sewing buddies recently reminded me of the old adage, “Friends don’t let friends sew home dec.” Well, she wasn’t around to stop me so I whipped up a new pair of couch pillows.

Have you ever had a fabric that just called to you? Demanded that you buy it? Something you love so much but had no idea what to do with? That was this fabric from The Cloth Pocket. I loved the neon yellow, plus navy, plus bronze metallic on ivory color scheme. I loved the texture of the weave. I had to have it. So I decided to make pillows. I bought new 20″ forms and several yards of pom-pom trim and got to work.

I made overlapping backs rather than zipper closures to make things easy. The trim makes the whole thing seem more “store bought.” They’re sunny and fun and I love them!

Grainline Farrow Dress

Grainline Farrow Dress

This is the Grainline Farrow Dress pattern that I sewed a sample for my new class at the Cloth Pocket.

I wanted a dress pattern that would be simple enough for true beginner garment sewists. Beginners often have a difficult time with bias binding around curved edges like armholes. This dress uses facings for the neck and armholes which are much easier to sew if you’re a newbie.

Grainline Farrow Dress

The dress went together quickly. Instructions were good as usual. The only major changes I did were grading between sizes at the hip which was probably unnecessary considering the dress is so A-shaped.

The fabric is from the Cloth Pocket. It’s a thin chambray with lovely drape a woven texture that forms a subtle stripe. I only thought about playing with the angle of the stripes after I cut out all four back pieces so only the bottom front panels go at an angle.

 

Grainline Farrow Dress

It was pretty windy today so you can see how well this fabric moves.

Grainline Farrow Dress

I did a blind hem by hand and finished all the seams with a serger.

Grainline Farrow Dress

On dresses like this without a defined waist shape I like to cut the hem a little extra high. I think the shorter length helps offset the lack of curves. I like that this dress has a subtle hi-low hem which makes shortening the hem a little safer if you know what I mean…

Grainline Farrow Dress

My favorite part about this dress are the pockets. They’re built into the two front pieces so they lay nice and flat and are tucked into the side and center front seams so they don’t flop around at all.

Grainline Farrow Dress

One thing I’d like to change about this pattern: it needs an all-in-one facing. This isn’t an issue if you make the sleeved version of the dress but for the sleeveless I’d rather have one complete facing than separate ones for the two armholes and the neckline.

Grainline Farrow Dress

Even if you tack down all the facings at the shoulder and side seams the armhole facings still like to flip out when you put the dress on. They don’t flop out while wearing the dress but still, it would be a cleaner finish.

If you’re in Austin and you want to learn to sew this dress, sign up for the class!

True Bias Southport Dress

True Bias Southport Dress

True Bias Southport Dress

Summer is in full swing here in Texas. Time for some sun dresses!

This is the Southport Dress by True Bias Patterns. I’m a little late on the Southport bandwagon but I’m so glad I hopped on. This is a great little dress!

I made the short version without any major changes.

This cotton stripe chambray came from a swap and was leftover from my Oceanside shorts.

True Bias Southport Dress

I liked the stripe so much that I chose to do bias binding on the arms and neckline rather than using the bias as a facing as the pattern calls for.

True Bias Southport Dress

The white buttons are vintage. I believe they’re some kind of carved stone. They’re too heavy to be shells, I think.

True Bias Southport Dress

The drawstring is just some cotton cording and I added two silver-colored metal stoppers from my stash to the ends.

True Bias Soutport Dress

I blinded hemmed the dress by hand and finished the seams with a zig zag stitch.

True Bias Southport Dress

My favorite little features are the stitched tacks at the top and bottom of each pocket along the side seams. They help keep the pockets sitting forward rather than being pushed toward the back of the dress or getting bunched up along on your sides. It’s a nice touch that adds some value to the pattern design.

True Bias Southport Dress

Fair warning, you’re probably gonna see this hat around a lot on the blog this summer. I am a convert to Church of Hat. It’s great for keeping the hot Texas sun off your face. Hats are highly underrated and I intend to get as much use out my hats as I can. Yay hats!

Closet Case Kalle Shirt

This is the first garment in several months that I’ve finished just for myself – not for a class, not sewing for anyone else. I liked the design of the Closet Case Kalle Shirt as soon as I saw it and printed it out immediately.

I sewed the popover style view B with the full collar and one pocket. I did shorten the length of both the front and back by about three inches. So it’s longer than view A but shorter than the original view B. I thought that might be more versatile for my wardrobe.The instructions were great – clear with well-labeled pieces. I liked the little tip for forming curved pocket corners and I appreciate a slightly smaller undercollar piece. Details like that make for a good pattern.

The placket goes together well if you pay special attention to all of those indicated fold lines, which I didn’t, ’cause I was lazy. Take my advice, follow the placket instructions carefully and you’ll be successful.

This fun polka-dot fabric is an especially smooth and finely woven Japanese cotton from The Cloth Pocket. I love it! It’s so soft and surprisingly doesn’t wrinkle much for a cotton. It’s so well printed that it’s difficult to tell the front side from the back. It’s thin but opaque, the perfect shirt fabric. I couldn’t find it on their website but if you come across it, definitely pick some up.

Buttons are just some simple plastic ones from Joann. I went with black so as not to compete with the fabric.

This shirt feels like a nice store bought shirt: great fabric, everything inside is finished with a serger, cute and stylish design.

This shirt might be just the thing I needed to get out of my sewing-funk. It’s a simple design with a lot of style which makes it easy to sew but also rewarding to finish.

Next, I’m starting a new historical costume which should be quite a bit of work but I hope finishing this shirt will inspire me to get sewing again!